From: "Dylan Sung" 

Newsgroups: sci.lang

Subject: Re: World's Greatest Linguist?????

Date: Sun, 1 Jul 2001 18:59:42 +0100



sdlee@eti.hku.hk wrote in message ...

:>>>>> "Daniel" == Daniel Caballero 

writes:

:

:    Daniel> Also, the learning rate (from scratch and with no previous

:    Daniel> knowledge of the other language) of modern simplified

:    Daniel> Chinese characters has to be faster than the learning rate

:    Daniel> of the relatively more complicated Japanese characters,

:

:Wrong.  You're basing on the *NAIVE* assumption that simpler shapes or

:fewer strokes per character would make the ideographic system simpler.

:The fact is that these have made characters of very different meanings

:and  pronunciations  LOOK  ALIKE.   In  other words,  it's  harder  to

:distinguish  different  characters  in  the  simplifed  set  than  the

:traditional set.





That's quite right. The publication of DiErCi HanZi JianHua FangAn (CaoAn)

or Second Hanzi Simplification Scheme (Draft) published in RenMin RiBao

(People's Daily) on December 20th 1977, p.4, made some drastic

simplifications whereby the newly created characters became hard to

distinguish between similar looking existing and new characters. In

paragraph 4 it mentions that out of the 4500 most often used characters,

only 1300 characters now had 10 character strokes or above.



In several tables it goes on to list the new simplifications. Some of these

were according to pronunciation, for instance, the proposed simplified form

of the hanzi for meaning 'dance' was the same as the character meaning

'noon' as both were pronounced wu3. For dialect speakers, this presents

something of a problem, since wu3 (dance) is pronuounced in Cantonese as

mou23, but wu3 (noon) was pronounced ng35. (The far left column of @ is for

aligning the text only.)





@ wu3          dance                            noon

@      @@                                  @@

@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@            @@

@    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@            @@

@   @@@@@    @@    @@    @@                @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@  @@@ @@    @@    @@    @@               @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@  @@  @@    @@    @@    @@              @@@     @@

@  @   @@    @@    @@    @@              @@      @@

@    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@         @@@      @@

@    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@         @@       @@

@      @@    @@    @@    @@            @@        @@

@      @@    @@    @@    @@          @@@         @@

@      @@    @@    @@    @@          @@          @@

@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@                @@

@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@                @@

@        @@              @@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@        @@              @@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@       @@@@@@@@@  @@@@@@@@@@@@                  @@

@      @@@@@@@@@@  @@@@@@@@@@@@                  @@

@     @@@      @@  @@    @@                      @@

@    @@@ @@    @@  @@    @@                      @@

@    @@  @@@   @@  @@    @@                      @@

@         @@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@                @@

@          @@@@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@                @@

@        @@@@@           @@                      @@

@       @@@@@            @@                      @@

@  @@@@@@@@              @@                      @@

@  @@@@@@                @@                      @@

@                        @@                      @@

@                        @@                      @@



The simplified proposals for the characters south (nan2) and business

(shang1) had the filling of the lower wrapper removed, so the they  looked

like the following two asciiart



@ shang1 (business)

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@          @@          @@                     @@          @@

@          @@@        @@@                     @@@        @@@

@           @@@      @@@                       @@@      @@@

@            @@      @@                         @@      @@

@      @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@             @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@      @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@             @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@      @@                  @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@      @@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@   @@@      @@@   @@             @@                  @@

@      @@  @@@        @@@  @@             @@                  @@

@      @@ @@@          @@@ @@             @@                  @@

@      @@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@             @@                  @@

@      @@@@  @@@@@@@@@@  @@@@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@      @@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@      @@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@      @@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@      @@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@      @@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@@@@@@@@@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@@@@@@@@@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@              @@  @@             @@              @@  @@

@      @@              @@@@@@             @@              @@@@@@

@      @@               @@@@              @@               @@@@

@      @@                 @               @@                 @

@

@ nan2 (south)

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@                @@                                 @@

@      @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@             @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@      @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@             @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@      @@   @@        @@   @@             @@                  @@

@      @@   @@@      @@@   @@             @@                  @@

@      @@    @@@    @@@    @@             @@                  @@

@      @@     @@    @@     @@             @@                  @@

@      @@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@  @@             @@                  @@

@      @@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@  @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@        @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@        @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@        @@             @@                  @@

@      @@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@  @@             @@                  @@

@      @@  @@@@@@@@@@@@@@  @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@        @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@        @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@        @@             @@                  @@

@      @@        @@    @@  @@             @@              @@  @@

@      @@        @@    @@@@@@             @@              @@@@@@

@      @@        @@     @@@@              @@               @@@@

@      @@                 @               @@                 @





Since normal printing is a tiny fraction of this size, visibility of the top

portion is not always guaranteed, especially when there is poor print

quality involved. Mainland books are sometimes poorly printed sadly.



Another example, shen1 (body) looked like bopomofo for the initial 'l'



@            shen1 (body)              bopomofo 'l' ?

@              @@

@             @@@                           @@

@            @@@                            @@

@            @@                     @@      @@

@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@         @@      @@

@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@         @@      @@

@        @@            @@           @@      @@

@        @@            @@           @@      @@

@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@           @@      @@

@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@           @@      @@

@        @@            @@           @@      @@

@        @@            @@    @@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@   @@@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@        @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@  @@@             @@      @@

@        @@            @@ @@@             @@@      @@

@        @@            @@@@@              @@       @@

@        @@            @@@@              @@@       @@

@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@                @@        @@

@     @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@               @@@        @@

@                  @@@@@@              @@@         @@

@                @@@@  @@              @@         @@@

@              @@@@@   @@             @@@         @@

@            @@@@@     @@             @@         @@

@         @@@@@@       @@            @@@         @@

@      @@@@@@@         @@           @@@         @@

@    @@@@@@@           @@          @@@          @@

@  @@@@@           @@  @@         @@@      @@  @@

@  @@@             @@@ @@        @@@       @@@@@@

@                   @@@@        @@@         @@@

@                     @         @@           @

@





:Now, which do you think is harder  to learn (at least to read)?  A set



:of  characters are  simple  in shape  but  look alike?   Or  a set  of

:characters with *enough* differences to  make them easy to tell apart?

:(Note my use of *enough*  here.  I think the traditional character set

:has already  evolved to an  optimimum (or something close)  during its

:2000 years of continuous usage.  During this period, especially at the

:earlier times, we did have adjustments to the set.  The adjustments do

:include   simplification   (to   improve   writing   efficiency)   and

:complication (to improve visual discernability).)





The 1977 proposal was later dropped, although one does see a few of those

characters used unofficially.





:    Daniel> and not only because of the number of strokes involved,

:    Daniel> but also because even for the simplest words in Chinese

:    Daniel> you are forced to learn a character.

:

:Again, I think once you've grapse how the characters work, the cost it

:takes to  acquire a few  more characters is very  small.  (Apparently,

:Nicola still hasn't passed this  stage.)  Usually, when one has learnt

:around the most frequent 1000  characters, one can already read a lot,

:and learning the next 1000 would take much less time, because of their

:experiences and better knowledge of how the system works.





Chinese taught in HK schools gives the child a repetoire of 2600 characters

to the sixth grade of xiaoxue (primary school). There are guides for parents

available in bookshops in HK, which also have the simplified forms as well

as the traditional for reference, including four character sayings, common

compounds, and the use of characters in compounds which are homophonous.

With this many characters, there is already the potential for a massive

amount of vocabulary. This is but a basic number that school kids learn.

Chinese children in HK have access to books that are not limited to the

number of characters in their school curriculum. They read, lookup

characters, and learn infrequently used characters too. How old is a sixth

grader in HK's xiaoxue, SauDan?



By the time they leave high school, students in HK entering the workplace

will have acquired around 4500 or more characters for their everyday use.



Dyl.